Central region

Presumed monkeypox cases in Virginia jump to 40 after Central Region resident infected

A new suspected case of monkeypox in a central Virginia resident has brought the total number of cases in the Commonwealth to 40, the Virginia Department of Health announced Thursday.

Download the FOX 5 DC News app for the latest local news and weather

Officials say the case was reported in an adult male who recently traveled out of state. The infected patient is in isolation, according to health officials. The local health district identifies and monitors the man’s close contacts and offers vaccines.

Digitally colorized electron microscope (EM) image of a monkeypox virion (virus particle), obtained from a clinical specimen associated with a 2003 prairie dog outbreak, released June 6, 2022. (Smith Collection/Gado/ Getty Images)

Several countries, including the United States, are currently experiencing an outbreak of monkeypox.

Three deaths have been reported worldwide, but none so far in the United States

As of July 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had reported 11,068 cases of monkeypox in 65 countries. Of these, 1,053 cases have been reported in the United States

SUBSCRIBE TO FOX 5 DC ON YOUTUBE

CDC Monkeypox Signs, Symptoms, and Prevention:

Monkeypox is a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus. The monkeypox virus is part of the same family of viruses as smallpox. Symptoms of monkeypox are similar to symptoms of smallpox, but milder; and monkeypox is rarely fatal. Monkeypox is not related to chickenpox.

Symptoms of monkeypox can include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain and back pain
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Chills
  • Exhaustion
  • A rash that may look like pimples or blisters that appears on the face, inside the mouth, and on other parts of the body, such as the hands, feet, chest, genitals, or throat. anus.

The rash goes through different stages before it heals completely. The illness usually lasts 2 to 4 weeks. Sometimes people have a rash first, followed by other symptoms. Others only experience a rash.

Monkeypox is spread in different ways. The virus can be spread from person to person by:

  • direct contact with infectious rashes, scabs, or body fluids
  • respiratory secretions during prolonged face-to-face contact or during intimate physical contact, such as kissing, hugging, or having sex
  • touching items (such as clothing or bedding) that have already touched the infectious rash or bodily fluids
  • pregnant women can transmit the virus to their fetus through the placenta

It is also possible for people to contract monkeypox from infected animals, either by being scratched or bitten by the animal, or by preparing or eating meat or using products from an animal. infected.

Monkeypox can spread from the time symptoms appear until the rash has completely healed and a new layer of skin has formed. The illness usually lasts 2 to 4 weeks. People who do not have symptoms of monkeypox cannot transmit the virus to others. At this time, it is not known whether monkeypox can be spread through semen or vaginal secretions.

Prevention steps

Take the following steps to avoid contracting monkeypox:

  • Avoid close skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox. Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox. Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone who has monkeypox. Do not share utensils or cups with someone who has monkeypox.
  • Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox.
  • Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone who has monkeypox.
  • Do not share utensils or cups with someone who has monkeypox.
  • Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of someone with monkeypox.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • In Central and West Africa, avoid contact with animals that can spread monkeypox viruses, usually rodents and primates. Also, avoid sick or dead animals, as well as bedding or any other material they have touched.

If you are sick with monkeypox:

  • isolate at home
  • If you have an active rash or other symptoms, stay in a separate room or area away from the people or pets you live with, if possible.

Vaccination

The CDC recommends vaccinating people who have been exposed to monkeypox and people who are at higher risk of being exposed to monkeypox, including:

  • People who have been identified by public health officials as a contact of someone with monkeypox
  • People who may have been exposed to monkeypox, such as: People who know that one of their sex partners in the past 2 weeks has been diagnosed with monkeypox People who have had multiple sex partners in the past 2 last weeks in an area where monkeypox is known
  • People who know that one of their sexual partners in the past 2 weeks has been diagnosed with monkeypox
  • People who have had multiple sexual partners in the past 2 weeks in an area where monkeypox is known
  • People whose jobs may expose them to orthopoxvirusessuch as: Laboratory workers who perform tests for orthopoxviruses Laboratory workers who handle cultures or animals carrying orthopoxviruses Certain designated health or public health workers
  • Lab workers performing tests for orthopoxviruses
  • Laboratory workers who handle orthopoxvirus-carrying cultures or animals
  • Certain designated health or public health officers